From the Editor: About This Issue

By Mike Rosso

I’d like to start off with a bit of business.

Last month, due to negligence on the part of our new printer, many of you received only a portion of the July issue and in some cases, only the cover. The problem lay with the “stitch and trim” process, the last order of business before the magazines are shipped to us. With apparently little oversight, the printers allowed over 900 copies of the magazine to be shipped with compromised stitching, resulting in many magazines falling apart in transit.

This was disastrous for us as we spent a good portion of the past month repackaging and resending magazines – time we could have spent researching articles, selling advertising, and other day-to-day business. We’re happy with the quality of the actual printing but when the last worker neglects to do their job well, the entire works fail. We’ve been promised this will not happen again and if you are reading this, chances are they’ve corrected the problems. If you were one of the unlucky ones to have not received an intact version of the July issue, please contact us by email at cozinemag@gmail.com or give a call at 719-530-9063 and we’ll make it right.

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The Lariat Loop: An Engineering Marvel at Texas Creek

A view of the Texas Creek bridge and a D&R.G.R.R. passenger train climbing up towards Inspiration Point for the trip to Westcliffe, circa 1890s. Courtesy of  the Denver Public Library.
A view of the Texas Creek bridge and a D&R.G.R.R. passenger train climbing up towards Inspiration Point for the trip to Westcliffe, circa 1890s. Courtesy of the Denver Public Library.

By Forrest Whitman

Readers of Colorado Central have probably driven right next to the roadbed of a spectacular railroad loop without noticing it. Even today, the Rio Grande’s Texas Creek extension gives us spectacular views of a line built around the mountainside and up to the sky. Getting a view and photo of its high reaches above the Arkansas Valley led us on a trip there recently.

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Book Reviews – The Railroads of Leadville, Colorado

SILVER RAILS: The Railroads of Leadville, Colorado By Christopher James Sierra Grande Press ISBN 978-0-9670867-2-6 Reviewed by Forrest Whitman This is the book I want for Christmas. I’ve read many books about railroads and railroading, but this one stands out. Many of these rail books have great pictures of a historical era or region. Others …

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The Caboose

by Forrest Whitman Train Day is coming May 9, and at least 20 of us from Colorado Central territory will be on the Southwest Chief train that day. We’ll meet other Chief fans along the way and spend the night in Las Vegas, New Mexico. There will be partying on and off the train. We …

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Book Review – Hollywood’s Railroads, Volume Three: Narrow Gauge Country

Hollywood’s Railroads, Volume Three: Narrow Gauge Country By Larry Jensen Cochetopa Press  72 pages ISBN 978-0-692-31351-0 Reviewed by Forrest Whitman Here’s a little gem of a railroad book that explains a lot about Colorado Central country. As recently as 1968, both of our narrow gauge railroads in southern Colorado were threatened with extinction. The D&RGW …

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The caboose

by Forrest Whitman

Fun Fall Train Trips

Fall is a great time of year to take a train trip anywhere … crisp fall mornings add a little zest, and when those steam whistles blow you step right along the platform. Rail history buffs enjoy train trips just for the chance to retrace old routes from a century and a half ago, and hear those steam whistles scream. But you don’t have to be a history buff to ride the Georgetown loop railroad or the San Luis and Rio Grande Scenic Railroad. Those rides are just plain fun. AMTRAK riders have some news this fall too, which I’ll get to in this column.

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Third cook on the train

Letter from Francisco Armando Rios

Railroads – January 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

Editors:

At subscription-renewal time, a city feller asks himself: “Why do I want to renew my subscription to Colorado Central? These days I’m more likely to visit Amache, the Beecher Island Battleground, Pawnee Buttes, the site of the Pleasant Hill school bus tragedy, and Picketwire Canyon — a different Colorado, in other words, sometimes far removed from the peaks and passes of Colorado Central country.” Well, the city feller renews his subscription (the check is in the mail) because, after a few intervening decades, he wants to revivify his memories of time spent in Central Colorado — and western Colorado generally.

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A higher line

Letter from Tom Mackelvie

Railroads – January 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

Ed:

I read in the December edition about “high altitude” railroads in Colorado (and the world) and thought you might have overlooked the Argentine Central, a line from Georgetown to the top of Mt. McClellan, just east of Grays peak).

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The latest gossip about the Tennessee Pass line

Article by Ken Stitzel

Railroads – March 2004 – Colorado Central Magazine

CENTRAL COLORADO is haunted by ghost railroads. Some rails are long gone, but you can drive where the trains once ran: over Marshall Pass in the summer or through the Midland Tunnels on the county road just north of Buena Vista.

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Distracted writer?

Letter from Laird Campbell

Railroads – October 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine

Distracted writer?

Dear Ed:

I think you must have been distracted when you approved the map which appears on page 30 of the September issue. It shows the South Park line to Baldwin on the Rio Grande Route between Gunnison and Crested Butte. Baldwin is on Ohio Creek and I enclose a tracing showing how this portion of the map should have looked.

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Good job on the South Park

Letter from Dave Primus

Railroads – October 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine

Ed,

Nice articles on the DSP&P in the recent Colorado Central. Also, thanks for mentioning our annual convention in Leadville. We had a great time, even on Saturday when the weather didn’t quite cooperate. One correction, though. We had members from across the U.S., one from Canada, and another from the U.K.

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What’s up with the Creede line?

Brief by Marcia Darnell

Railroads – June 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine

It’s been a couple of years since the brouhaha over the railway from South Fork to Creede has been in the news. Despite the pending lawsuit, Don Shank, the owner of the 21.6-mile line, says it’ll be operational by Memorial Day 2005.

“Darn near every day someone’s working on the line,” he said recently. His group is rehabilitating the track and bringing in additional equipment. He says he has a 44-ton locomotive in Loveland being worked on and a 3,000-hp road locomotive in South Fork.

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C&TS is vital to Antonito’s economy

Sidebar by Marcia Darnell

Railroads – June 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine

How important is the Cumbres and Toltec Railroad to Antonito? Judging by the numbers, it’s critical.

Those numbers have fluctuated in the last couple of years, due to the train’s trouble with the economy and fire restrictions. According to Richard Gomez, executive director of the C&TRR Commission, the operation put $45 million into Rio Arriba (New Mexico) and Conejos (Colorado) counties in 2001, the last time the train had a full season.

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Cumbres & Toltec will steam on this summer

Article by Mark H. Hunter

Railroads – June 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine

THE LITTLE TRAIN that “could” still can and will operate again this summer after a winter of discontent that nearly derailed it for good.

The Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad, a historic, coal-fired tourist train that winds through the southern Rocky Mountains from Antonito, Colorado, to Chama, New Mexico, will begin operations on Saturday, June 14 and continue until October 19. The popular narrow-gauge line, which pumps millions of dollars into the economies of both small towns, usually begins operations on Memorial Day weekend, but mechanical problems with its steam-powered locomotives delayed full operations, according to officials.

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