Western Water Report: May 7, 2006

FLY FISHERS EMERGE FOR COLORADO CADDIS HATCH

The annual caddis hatch that brings fly-fishers out onto Colorado’s Arkansas River and the fish looking up is also a boom to local retailers who feed and house the anglers and provide them with flies, scotch and cigars. Denver Post; April 12 <http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_3700264> <http://durangoherald.com/asp-bin/article_generation.asp?article_type=news&article_path=/news/06/news060425_2.htm>

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The coming problem with hay

Column by Hal Walter

Agriculture – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

IT IS A LOT OF STUFF to focus on at once, especially for someone with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and perhaps mild dyslexia — a steering wheel, clutch, double brake pedals, hand throttle, gearshift, three-point hay fork, a buggy whip, a swinging gate and six frisky escape-minded horses.

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Perfecting escapism

Letter from Slim Wolfe

Immigration – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

Editors:

After reading Hal Walter’s excellent bit of political hackery (as he calls it) on immigrant labor, three questions come to mind which rarely get asked:

1) Why do we in the U.S. think we deserve more drudge labor than we can provide without outside help?

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Immigration is purely an economic issue

Letter from Paul Martz

Immigration – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

Editors

My first reaction to reading Hal Walter’s column in the April edition, even after reading the postscript apology, was one of disbelief. I quite frankly found his apparent conclusions about the current illegal alien situation to be abhorrent. He seems to be saying that all other legitimate considerations aside, it’s OK to exploit these people if it’s for the good of the economy.

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No longer sleepy and rural

Letter from Charlie Green

Development – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

Editors:

Regarding Pagosa Springs’ future [“Another town that doesn’t want to be like Aspen,” April edition], the last time I passed through the town some years back, my immediate reaction was “Woodland Park Southwest.” Same strip malls and commercial development along the highways. But now that is changing with an influx of big money. By the time this is published, the Mayor’s race, essentially a referendum on development, will be decided. The long-time incumbent, Ross Aragon, unabashedly supports the growth.

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Designing for a Better World

Article by Sue Snively

Local Artists – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

“The people who give form to our mass produced products have fallen into a visual habit of cubic shapes, chrome trim, and dark-tinted plexiglass to solve all imaginable design dilemmas. The modern office, for example is tantamount to a sensory deprivation chamber with its beige panels, electronic boxes, and even lighting.

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Into the Phoenix Zone

Column by George Sibley

Water – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

SPRINGTIME IN THE ROCKIES is the cruelest season: melting followed by freezing, short bursts of sun routed by volleys of snow, all staged around dirty piles of pushed-up snow melting down to an even layer of assorted trash.

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Same song, different tempo

Essay by Deric Pamp

War – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

THE THIRD ANNIVERSARY of America’s invasion of Iraq was March 19. Whatever its strengths may be, this Administration does not cheerfully seek out opinions that differ from Administration policies, so I would not expect our elected leaders to respond to protests against the war. I doubt that they even notice them: Bush is too busy boogying on some mental stage, Rummy is planning the bombing and subsequent invasion of Iran, and Cheney simply doesn’t care about the little people who protest the war or fight in it. Nevertheless, I joined the small group of people who met in Riverside Park in Salida on March 19 to mark the date and to state our upset and disagreement with the war.

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Adventures in Xeriscaping

Article by Ray Schoch

Water – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

ALL RIGHT CLASS, it’s time to review. Back in May of 2003, you read an article in this very magazine advocating the use of xeriscape, or “water-smart” landscape design.

No peeking, now — who was the author? Where did he live? What were his motivation(s)?

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Talkin’ ’bout our immigration

Essay by Martha Quillen

Immigration – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

ON THE NATIONAL FRONT, immigration has clearly been a leading issue. But in Salida, it hasn’t quite caught up with Christo’s curtains. Hal Walter’s last column, however, sure brought it home to us. Hal wrote, “To me, any opposition to immigration seems rooted more in racism than in economics.” And in response, numerous people called to tell us how wrong he was.

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Who really needs to go?

Essay by John Mattingly

Environment – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

WHENEVER I HEAR about the scourge of salt cedar, also known as the tamarisk, I can’t help but notice how similar Tamarix aphylla is to Homo sapiens. Both species transplanted to the southwestern United States for what seemed like good reasons at the time, only to proliferate out of control. Both produce a toxic effect on their surroundings, at the expense of predecessor and competing species. And both are very fond of water.

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The Trouble with Tamarisk

Sidebar by Marcia Darnell

Environment – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

Doze it, dig it, cut it, poison it. Removing tamarisk is a task.

Tamarisk, also know as salt cedar, is deadly to streambanks. The plant absorbs an enormous amount of water, up to 200 gallons a day, then leaves a salt residue that kills native plants. It is therefore designated enemy number one in many areas.

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Teamwork restores the banks of the Rio Grande

Article by Marcia Darnell

Environment – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

Cooperation among environmentalists, landowners, and government is rare, but when it works, it flows. Such teamwork is taking place on the historic Rio Grande in southern Colorado.

The Rio Grande Headwaters Restoration Project unites disparate groups who depend on the river in order to restore and preserve the great waters, one reach at a time. This endeavor was started by the San Luis Valley Water Conservancy District in 1999 when the district’s board applied for funds from the Colorado Water Conservation Board for a study of the Rio Grande and its functions.

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Are some strings being pulled at Wolf Creek?

Article by Allen Best

Development – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

BILLY JOE “RED” MCCOMBS, the billionaire from Texas intent on building a part-time city at Wolf Creek Pass, now has a permit to build a road across the national forest. Whether he’ll keep it is the question in what has become a major story of big bucks, thin air, and allegations of unethical meddling by Bush administration appointees in Washington D.C.

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Rural school districts and declining enrollment

Article by Charlie Green

Education – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

WHEN I BECAME a member of the Cotopaxi Board of Education, I didn’t know much about how school districts operate. It’s been quite a learning curve! Like any organization, there are budgets, facilities, and personnel. But school districts have some fundamentally different issues concerning things like teaching standards, school trips, and money. This article is mostly about money.

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Regional Roundup

Brief by Ed Quillen

Local News – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

Er, ah, Leadville resident?

Is a Leadville resident a Leadvillite, a Leadhead, or a Leadvillian? Marcia Martinek, editor of the Leadville Herald-Democrat, has been grappling with that question in recent editions. She was charmed by Leadvillian in 19th-century papers, and wanted to use it. However, she surveyed readers, and Leadvillite came out ahead.

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Sweating through a vacation

Brief by Central Staff

Recreation – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

If your idea of a vacation is a few days of hard work at high altitude, you have plenty of opportunities to enjoy yourself in the mountains this summer.

The Colorado Trail runs for about 470 miles from Denver to Durango, and it always needs work that ranges from maintenance to rerouting with new construction. The work is done by volunteers, who must be at least 16 years old and in good physical condition.

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Saguache Museum will open without a parade this year

Brief by Central Staff

Events – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

The Saguache County Museum in Saguache will open as usual this year on May 28, the Sunday before Memorial Day, but without the traditional parade, barbecue, and craft festival in Otto Mears Park.

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Who really lives in Bonanza?

Brief by Central Staff

Local Politics – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

Unlike many mountain towns where the mines have closed, Bonanza still has residents and a town government. And it has a controversy about who’s enough of a resident to be part of the town government.

Bonanza sits about 20 miles northwest of Villa Grove, and it had its scheduled municipal election on April 4. Turn-out was perfect — all 22 registered voters cast ballots.

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Water District won’t advise on appointments

Brief by Central Staff

Water – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

The Upper Arkansas Water Conservancy District board voted unanimously to eliminate the district’s participation in any advisory committee for director nominations.

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No next of kin found for slain Kokomo marshal

Brief by Allen Best

History – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

A national organization wants to commemorate a cop gunned down in an old mining town of Colorado 126 years ago, and that in turn has provoked a search for descendants of the slain cop.

But modern-day cops have had little luck. They can’t even find the grave of the fallen police officer, reports the Summit Daily News.

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Briefs from the San Luis Valley

Brief by Marcia Darnell

San Luis Valley – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

So Long

Alamosa City Manager Mike Hackett is leaving to run things in Arcata, Calif., his wife’s hometown.

“She’s been with me through thick and thin,” he said, “and we agreed if this job ever opened up, I’d apply, and if I got it, we’d go.”

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President’s job safe

Brief by Allen Best

Politics – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

As the saying goes, “Think globally, act locally,” and that’s pretty much how things turned out in Nederland, a mountain town high in the Front Range west of Boulder.

On April 11, its town board of trustees considered a resolution supporting the impeachment of President George W. Bush. It came from Trustee Scott Franklin, who said that the president’s actions affect town business, and “we have to speak up, or we’re not on the map…. It has to start somewhere.”

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Climax plans to resume production

Brief by Central Staff

Mining – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

After a year of study and speculation, Phelps-Dodge announced in early April that it plans to re-open the Climax Molybdenum Mine in 2009. The mine sits atop 11,318-foot Frémont Pass about a dozen miles northeast of Leadville.

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A teacher looks back at racism

Essay by Mary Scriver

Racism – May 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

IN 1961, WHEN I CAME to Browning, Montana, to teach, I emerged from my little rental — all dressed up — to investigate the town. A path headed towards the main street across a weedy empty lot. A tall Indian in a wide-brimmed hat started towards me. Was I going to have to walk into the burrs and ruin my nylons? Not to worry. The Indian swept off his hat, held it over his heart, stepped off the path, and said, “Mawnin’, teacher.” How could he tell I was a teacher? It never occurred to me that I was a white, dressed-up woman in a reservation town.

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