They didn’t like lawyers then, either

Sidebar by Central Staff

Salt Works – July 1996 – Colorado Central Magazine

The reputation of Lawyers in the Good Old Days

…the first and only salt works in Colorado. When these works were erected, in 1864, all the salt used in this whole western country had to be freighted in wagons from the Missouri river, 700 miles away, at a cost, for freight alone, of from four to 20 cents per pound. When the springs, near the works were discovered, they were thought to be very valuable, and no little contention arose as to the title. However, the first claims were settled and the business of salt making sprung up, and soon became very profitable. Then, as is too often the case in the west, litigation commenced between the owners, followed by injunction after injunction until all parties interested were impoverished. Meanwhile the railroads were advancing day by day, which meant cheap salt….We hear that it has been recently decided, now that the works are valueless, the litigants plucked, and the railroads have destroyed rich prospects. Moral: If you have a good business look out for, and keep out of the lawyers’ hands, they are hungry fellows always hunting a fat “grub stake.”

Read more

How the salt got there

Sidebar by Ed Quillen

Salt Works – July 1996 – Colorado Central Magazine

Geologists say the salt of South Park has been there for a long time — since the Pennsylvanian Period of the Paleozoic Era about 300 million years ago.

Like today, Colorado then boasted two parallel north-south mountain ranges: Uncompahgria and Frontrangia. Unlike today, these mountains were islands in a vast sea.

Read more