Growth and decline

Brief by Central Staff

Population – August 2008 – Colorado Central Magazine

Population growth and decline

Every year, the U.S. Census Bureau issues population estimates in July. This time around, Central Colorado generally showed growth, while much of the San Luis Valley lost population.

Costilla County, for instance, dropped 9.79%, from 3,668 people on July 1, 2000, to 3,309 on July 1, 2008. Also declining were Rio Grande County, a 6.46% drop with 11,627 residents this year, and Conejos County, which was down by 3.87% to 8,074 residents in 2008.

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In area anyway, Silver Cliff is area’s largest town

Brief by Central Staff

Population – December 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

One cold and windy night, our car was making strange noises as we returned to Salida from Trinidad, through the Wet Mountain Valley. We hadn’t seen another car since Gardner, so we were relieved when we spotted the “Silver Cliff City Limits” sign. But we still had to drive for a while before we actually saw even a street light of Silver Cliff — the town limits extend far beyond the town’s habitations.

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Feeling crowded these days?

Essay by Ben Long

Population – December 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine

ONE STATISTIC JUMPED OUT of the morning paper and jolted my brain.

The news was that America’s population hit 300 million this year. But it wasn’t that landmark figure that jarred my morning reverie. It was this: The United States population has grown from 200 million to 300 million since 1967. That’s the year I was born.

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What does the census tell us about ourselves?

Essay by Ed Quillen

Population – April 2000 – Colorado Central Magazine

JUST IN CASE you’ve been snowbound in a remote cabin since about October, without access to radio, television, or newspapers, I’ll remind you that the federal government is conducting a census this spring, as it does in April of every year that ends in zero.

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The Big Empty

Article by Martha Quillen

Population – April 1996 – Colorado Central Magazine

You wake up late, and look out your window — but no one is out there. There’s not a car or a pedestrian in sight. You live in a small town, however, so that doesn’t seem particularly unusual — until you leave your house to get a cup of coffee.

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