How Citizen Participation changed the Planning Profession

Essay by Kenneth D. Munsell

Planning – October 1999 – Colorado Central Magazine

TWO DAYS AGO, I turned on the television and happened upon a rural development conference. The state public affairs channel aired the meeting, and it involved panelists talking to state legislators about the problems and potentials of rural areas in Washington.

Experts in various fields gave their testimonies and talked about the structural economic development problems inherent in smallness: the inadequate numbers in the work force, the transportation networks, the lack of housing, and other dilemmas.

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Portland really isn’t planning to become Los Angeles

Letter by Bob Engel

Planning – June 1998 – Colorado Central Magazine

Portland really isn’t planning to become Los Angeles

Dear Editor:

In the article titled “Portland Plans to Becomes Los Angeles?” (Colorado Central, January 1998), the author, Randal O’Toole, manipulates the data to support his jaundiced view of Oregon’s approach to planning.

His article contained enough obvious twisting to prompt further research. I also telephoned Mr. O’Toole for his comments.

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Sedona offers a divine economic plan

Essay by Stephen Lyons

Planning – January 1998 – Colorado Central Magazine

MY WIFE AND I had just finished hiking Brims Mesa outside of Sedona, Ariz., when we spotted a woman at the trailhead wearing a purple velvet, or velour, dress that hung loosely to her bare ankles. A garish, glittery skull cap of the same hue covered her black mane. In her righthand she held a hawk feather, and around her neck dangled an assortment of necklaces, pendants, and a leather “medicine bag.” She was not smiling even though she was about to enter the famous red rocks of northern Arizona, one of the prettiest places in the galaxy.

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Let’s adopt a lesser plan

Essay by Marcia Darnell

Planning – January 1998 – Colorado Central Magazine

LAST SUMMER, a friend and I were winding our way through Crestone’s Baca Grande, an association-controlled, building-approved nondevelopment, when I saw something shocking.

“I didn’t know there was a hotel here,” I said.

It wasn’t a hotel. It wasn’t even a house. It was the garage to a house.

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Portland Plans to become Los Angeles

Essay by Randal O’toole

Planning – January 1998 – Colorado Central Magazine

Portland planners promised urban residents “livability” in the form of reduced congestion, affordable housing, and more open space.

— So it should come as no surprise that Portland is rapidly becoming one of the most congested, least affordable cities in the nation whose open space in the urban interior is rapidly disappearing.

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How communities can plan better for tourism

Planning – January 1998 – Colorado Central Magazine

by Edward T. McMahon

SO WHAT DID YOU DO on your summer vacation? Did the destination meet your expectations? Would you recommend it to a friend? Or did dirty air, traffic congestion, crowded beaches, slipshod service, or towns awash in tourist schlock leave you feeling frustrated and cheated?

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My part in the Salida plan

Essay by Martha Quillen

Planning – January 1998 – Colorado Central Magazine

AS FOR MY PART IN ALL THIS, I obtained a copy of the plan and read it before the first meeting. In truth, I couldn’t figure out how Salida could implement such a plan — since it offered an astounding amount of contradictory advice, and it frequently used language that was vague and confusing. The plan suggested housing where only rattlesnakes dwell, and proposed development on slopes that only a mountain goat could negotiate.

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Plan a vacation the next time your town makes a plan

Essay by Martha Quillen

Planning – January 1998 – Colorado Central Magazine

WELL, YOU KNOW WHAT they say about the best laid plans… Yet our communities are compelled to plan regardless.

In the last few years, Colorado towns, cities and counties have been driven to adopt comprehensive plans. The experts say communities need comprehensive plans in order to channel recent growth in desirable directions.

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