When the coyote is at the door, answer with a .30-30

Column by Hal Walter

Wildlife – April 1996 – Colorado Central Magazine

Just the other morning, I woke up to snarling, growling and barking that sounded like dogs rough-housing outside my bedroom window. I was immediately grouchy and wondered who was visiting me before the sun had even cleared the ridge — and why they had brought unruly curs. I tend to arise later than most ranchers because I stay up some nights practicing the dark witchcraft of journalism.

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Ken Wisecup: Art from bones and deadfall

Article by Leah Lahtinen

Local Artists – April 1996 – Colorado Central Magazine

TREES die for many different reasons. Some are felled for paper or lumber. Some are killed by porcupines or lightning or bugs. Others are weakened by old age. Standing deadwood in Custer County may find its ultimate end in one of many wood-burning stoves. Or, if it’s lucky, it may fall into the hands of Ken Wisecup, a fantasy furniture artist who specializes in creating new life from dead wood and bleached bones.

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Let’s quit improving ourselves

Essay by Martha Quillen

American Life – April 1996 – Colorado Central Magazine

As the 1996 elections commence, there’s one thing everyone seems to agree upon: America is headed in the wrong direction.

Even more surprising, both parties seem to agree about what should be done to right things: Slash the budget. Cut the entitlements. Employ more police officers to war against drugs and crime. Protect our children from portrayals of sex and violence. Stop illegal immigration.

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The Big Empty

Article by Martha Quillen

Population – April 1996 – Colorado Central Magazine

You wake up late, and look out your window — but no one is out there. There’s not a car or a pedestrian in sight. You live in a small town, however, so that doesn’t seem particularly unusual — until you leave your house to get a cup of coffee.

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Building a wetland: the natural way to treat sewage

Article by Sharon Chickering

Environment – April 1996 – Colorado Central Magazine

I sat in the sunny corner window of the Mt. Elbert Lodge with owners Scott Boyd and Laura Downing, watching flighty chickadees attack the hanging bird feeder. Just beyond the line of brown willows flowed the icy water of Lake Creek. There was nothing to indicate that under the picnic table sitting just below us in the snow lay the wastewater treatment system for the bed and breakfast resort.

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From Mayberry to Megabucks

Sidebar by Ray James

Law Enforcement – April 1996 – Colorado Central Magazine

In 1959, when Sheriff Harold Thonhoff had to pick up a man arrested in Phoenix, Arizona on a Chaffee County warrant, he wanted to leave Chaffee county with sufficient law enforcement protection. Thus, he enlisted the young deputy district attorney, Bob Rush, to travel with him. Rush now recalls that Salida was left with a few law officers, Police Chief Harry Cable and one or two others, and the county with the undersheriff and a deputy.

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Who gets to wear a badge

Sidebar by Ray James

Law Enforcement – April 1996 – Colorado Central Magazine

Cops, lawmen, police, deputies, guards and other terms (but “sir” or “ma’am” work well when addressing said people in person) all equal “peace officers” in Colorado. And, like most everything else these days, “peace officer” is defined by state law.

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Don’t do the crime if you can’t pay for the time

Sidebar by Ray James

Law Enforcement – April 1996 – Colorado Central Magazine

Frémont County is playing follow the leader to Chaffee County Sheriff Ron Bergmann by instituting a “room charge” for convicted inmates at the county jail. Bergmann explained that since state law allows him to charge those in jail under conviction, he decided to do so to reduce the burden on county citizens.

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How many police are enough?

Article by Ray James

Law Enforcement – April 1996 – Colorado Central Magazine

Central Colorado’s relative peace likely proves as much of an attraction to most ex-urban immigrants as do the low real estate prices. The mountains offer bucolic refuge for those who have lived with drive-by shootings, gang violence, serial killers and street-corner drug markets. Once “home” in the Rockies, if newcomers think of law enforcement at all, it is to be thankful that there are enough police to ensure that their old nightmares don’t come for a visit.

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